Young woman who is blind

 

 

 

 

Girl listening to headphonesgetting a wheelchair over a threshold

Independent Living

You have been there for your child since the day they were born. You have no doubt been their biggest advocate, securing their IEP accommodations, fighting for needed services, equipment, or benefits. Now that your child is heading toward adulthood you are no doubt experiencing a mix of relief, joy, and apprehension. It can be hard to let go.

What are some of the things you do for your child that they could be doing on their own?

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What are some of the ways that you can help your child feel empowered to manage their own life?

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Parent Tips on Conservatorships

When your teenager turns 18, he or she is legally an adult and can exercise the rights of an adult. Conservatorship is a legal process that allows parents to make decisions for their young adult who has a developmental disability that affects his or her ability to make decisions. If you are the parent of a young adult who is developmentally disabled, conservatorship may provide you with the authority to speak on behalf of your young adult, or to play a role in his or her medical care, which you would not otherwise have. Conservatorship would enable you to act on behalf of your young adult and may include making decisions for necessary medical treatment.

Whether or not to apply for conservatorship is a personal decision on the part of your family and your son or daughter. There are no right or wrong answers about whether to conserve a young adult. Some families choose to do so right before their son or daughter turns 18 or when they turn 18; some choose to do so later; and some choose not to do it all.

For more information on conservatorships, families can contact their county Bar Association or link to one of the following resource websites:

http://disabilityrightsca.org
Disability Rights of California's publication entitled "Conservatorship, Trusts and Wills for people with Developmental or other Disabilities

www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/seniors/handbook.htm
"Handbook for Conservators" published by the Judicial Council of California

www.dds.ca.gov/rc/home.cfm www.calbar.ca.gov/state/calbar/calbar_home.jsp
Click the Public Services link and then the Lawyer Referral Services
or 1-866-442-2529 (in California)

NOTE: This section provides information only and parents should consult with agencies that provide advocacy or legal services who handle conservatorships.